Big Dig Mini Museum

April 29, 2016
Joanne Kirton

After all the digging has finished, the tools have put away and all the finds have been washed, here at Big Heritage we undertake a lot of work to prepare the finds for specialist analysis and use all the information we have gathered to start putting together an excavation report. You can read some recent example here: Archaeology Publications

Once we have compiled all the information we can begin to interpret what has been found on any project. That's exactly what we are doing at the moment for Dig Blacon, a community archaeology project undertaken in 2015 with local residents from the Blacon area. You can learn more about the project here: Dig Blacon Project Page

However, we are very keen to share the outcomes of all our projects and often call on the help of those who helped us excavate, survey and care for the finds. This time is what the turn of pupils and staff at St Theresa's Primary School in Blacon. Project Assistant, Karen Gavin, reports.....

Curation Day

I have recently had the opportunity to visit Year 4 at St Theresa’s Primary School. This was a follow up visit after undertaking a number of test pits within the school grounds, as part of Dig Blacon. The purpose of the visit was to develop a temporary mini museum from the artefacts recovered within school grounds.

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                      Archaeological Project Assistant, Karen Gavin, and Year 4 from St Theresa's celebrating their museum display

The children were all prepared and ready for me joining them, and all remembered digging with Big Heritage last summer. I was a little late joining the class as Head teacher Mrs. Kirkman was eager to see the artefacts which I had brought with me for the children to develop their museum display!

Pupils and staff looked at the recovered artefacts and chose coins, clay tobacco pipe, a pottery sherd dating from the 16th century and a piece of flint which could have been waste from prehistoric tool production. The final artefact chosen was a piece of stone window frame, which came from an area associated with the 18th century farm complex, Blacon Hall. Blacon Hall once stood on the site of the modern day school grounds and formed the focus for the archaeological dig.

The mini museum curated by the pupils in year 4. The display includes a replica mug with two handles known as a tyg. This is to illustrate a typical piece of pottery which the fragment may have come from.

The mini museum curated by the pupils in year 4. The display includes a replica mug with two handles known as a tyg. This is to illustrate a typical piece of pottery which the fragment may have come from.

After mid-morning break the children were treated to Big Heritage’s award winning Roman Medicine Roadshow, performed by Rob in full Roman regalia. As might be expected this was slightly more animated than the museum curation activity and was thoroughly enjoyed by pupils and teachers alike.

It was an absolute pleasure to spend some time with the children of St Theresa’s who were without exception engaged in the activities and pleasant and polite throughout.

 

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